American Universities

Many  ESL students at Hancock International College are studying English so they can transfer over to an American university. But what will happen as an international student when you are in class? Are you prepared for an American style classroom?

Katy Hopkins, a staff writer with U.S. News, explains what many students have come to find out, “Classroom differences: A U.S. education—particularly at the graduate level–may be more hands-on and interactive than what you’ve experienced in another country, which could come as a shock to new students who haven’t prepared beforehand.

‘Be informed about how the life of being a student [is],’ recommends Diah Wihardini, a native of Indonesia who’s studying education at the University of California–Berkeley. ‘Here, you are expected to be an independent learner [and] have to have more upfront knowledge of what is going to be expected of [you].’

The work isn’t necessarily harder, she says, but it’s different. For example, students in the United States may take fewer courses but delve much deeper into the subject material than they might in Indonesia.

In class, students also may be expected to speak up more than in their home countries. Having to ‘perform’ in class or being invited to swing by professors’ office hours afterwards came as a surprise to Anne Berg, a student from Denmark who’s also studying at UC—Berkeley.

‘Professors are accessible, and you can actually talk to them,’ she notes.

But channels for open communication also mean that, in class, her professors demand ‘real discussion,’ rather than simply lecturing. To thrive in an interactive class setting, ‘you have to have some sort of competitive edge, or you’ll get rolled over,’ Berg says. ‘If you go to the U.S., you have to be competitive.’”

For the other 2 “surprises” Katy Hopkins reports on that international students find check out the following URL!

Full Article: https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/2012/04/18/3-surprises-for-international-students-at-us-universities

Idiom of the Day

Do your homework

Meaning: do research before hand

Example: The car salesman tried to sell me something I didn’t need. But I did my homework and knew he was just trying to upsell me.